Flash Fiction: I’ll See You in The Afternoon

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An older man walks his grand-daughter to school every morning. She is five years old and started Kindergarten. The grand-father takes her to her class, kisses her goodbye, and he always says, “I’ll see you in the afternoon.” 

Five years pass, and the little girl is ten-years-old. She is growing into a teenager, but still, her grandfather walks her to school. He drops her off by the entrance and says, “Want me to walk you to your classroom?” She nods her head no; she kisses and hugs her grandpa goodbye. Then, he says, “I’ll see you in the afternoon.”

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Another five years pass, and the teenager argues with him every morning. They argue because she no longer wants her grandfather to escort her to school anymore and ashamed. She is in high school and wants to walk with her boyfriend. However, the grandpa still sees her as he did the first day of school. He gets his feelings hurt and only tells her goodbye when she leaves the door. Due to the fights and shouting every morning, the grandfather feels pressure running down his chest. 

One morning, he wakes up feeling dizzy and shortness of air. He walks to the teenager’s room to tell her if she can stay home with him. She argues and yells, “I’m not a little girl anymore! And stop asking if you can walk me to school!” He frowns and slowly walks back to his room to lay down. A tear drops down his cheek, and he falls asleep. The teenager walks out of the house and slams the door. When the little girl was small, she loved and hugged her grandfather. As she grew, love faded away, and the grandfather tried his best to love her every morning. 

© Daniel Sanchez 2019

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